About Me
I'm a Melbourne boy, hailing from St Kilda with one ex, one current wife and four kids. Love the outdoors and making new discoveries. I cook a lot at home (cheers from wife) and do some preserving, mostly jams, pickles and fruit liqueurs. This is the diary of a cooking journey.

My Complete Profile

Recent Posts
Guilty Pleasure
Five Things Before I Die
A Cautionary Tale
In Praise of Older Women
Who Me?
The Gift
On Fire
An Interesting Read
Tricks of the Trade
Children of The Curry

Links
1001 Dinners 1001 Nights
A Few of My Favourite Things
Abstract Gourmet
Apellation Australia
Becks and Posh
BurgerMary ATX
Cook (almost) Anything at least once
Cooking Down Under
Cook sister!
Cooked And Bottled In Brunswick
David Lebovitz
Deep Dish Dreams
Chef Paz
Chubby Hubby
Eating Melbourne
Eating With Jack
essjay eats
Food Lover's Journey
Gosstronomy
Grab Your Fork
I Am Obsessed With Food
I Eat Therefore I Am
Iron Chef Shellie
Just Desserts
Kalyn's Kitchen
Kitchen Wench
Lobstersquad
Matt Bites
Melbourne Gastronome
My Kitchen in Half Cups
Nola Cuisine
Not Quite Nigella
Nourish Me
Seriously Good
Souvlaki For The Soul
Stone Soup
Sunnybrae
Syrup and Tang
Steve Don't Eat It!
That Jess Ho
The Elegant Sufficiency
The Perfect Pantry
The View From My Porch
Thyme for Cooking
Tomato
Tumeric & Saffron
tummy rumbles
What I Cooked Last Night
where's the beef
WhiteTrashBBQ
Vicious Ange

Food Blog Resources
Food Blog S'cool
I Eat I Drink I Work
Kiplog Food Links

Food for Thought
Autism Victoria
Autism Vox
forget me now
Lotus Martinis
MOM - Not Otherwise Specified
St Kilda Today

Tuesday, August 29, 2006
Something Fishy
Sometimes it's so hard being a foodie.

I was chatting with Reb from CucinaRebecca about anchovies. To date I have been happy with regular supermarket anchovies in the tin or small glass jar and apart from small differences in quality there never seemed a lot of difference between brands, one small hairy fish was much like any other small hairy fish, right?

Wrong!

Reb assures me that the Ortiz brand of anchovy are the Rolls Royce of anchovies, even comparing them to Grange Hermitage, Australia's best known and iconic wine, against cask shiraz. Well the price differential sure is similar, with Grange, depending on vintage, retailing for better than $400 and a humble cask about $20. The last time I looked Ortiz anchovies were about $20 a tin as opposed to about $3 a tin for regular supermarket ones. So now it looks like I have to part with my hard earned and taste the difference for myself. Is it wrong to secretly hope I don't like them all that much?

The other thing Reb mentioned was that the Ortiz anchovy was not one for use in cooking where they are to be melted down, for this she recommends using regular anchovies. The Ortiz fish is best savoured in its entirety, for its aromatic and refined taste, and Reb suggests an anchovy pizza as a good way to highlight its character.

So just as one brand of this fish is poles apart from all other brands, this small hairy fish as it is affectionately known, because its ultra small bones resemble a bit of fuzzy hair, completely polarises opinions as to its culinary virtue. You either love it or hate it. I have a mate who hates garlic and when cooking for him, would always ask if I put garlic in or not. Figuring that if he had to ask, then he didn't really hate it all that much and so generally added it to his food and told him bald faced lies about its presence. Funny, he always said my food was very tasty! So it is with anchovies. When melted into a sauce or casserole their presence is virtually undetectable but adds a deep flavour boost. Whenever I make a pasta sauce based on tomato, one or two fillets always find their way in, because anchovy fillets melt readily with heat, no one knows they are there.

I suppose if I cooked garlic bread for my garlic hating mate, he would have been on to me, though in his case I would have done something completely different but just as tasty in its own way, and that is anchovy bread. For anyone a bit tired of garlic bread, this is a great alternative. The butter mellows the flavour of the anchovies and what could be better to hairy fish lovers than their favourite treat on warm, crusty bread?

Anchovy Bread

125 g (5 oz) softened unsalted butter
8 to 10 anchovy fillets
1 French stick or baguette

Pound the anchovy fillets to a paste in a pestle and mortar, or pass through a garlic press. Mix well with the softened butter. Slice the bread nearly all the way through, in 1/2" (1.5 cm) slices. Butter each side of bread with the anchovy butter, slather a bit over the top, then wrap the french stick in foil and bake for 20 minutes in a 200 c (400 f) oven.
 
  posted at 7:52 am
  10 comments



10 Comments:
At 9:39 am, Blogger gigi said...

I love anchovies and always have, although I've only had the supermarket brands. My husband, on the other hand, won't even be in the same room with them; needless to say I haven't had any in years.

I wonder what would happen if I just 'melted' them into a marinara as you say...hmnn. I wonder if I dare.

 
At 12:41 pm, Anonymous Tanna said...

Gadfry, Gigi may have you to blame for some heavy duty stress in that relationship.
I'm fine with anchovy, think like you do - so do I need to put Ortiz anchovy on my list of five things to eat before I die?
The bread sounds really excellent!

 
At 8:44 am, Blogger neil said...

Hi gigi, I have the same problem with roast meats - my wife likes well done, I prefer rare, so guess who misses out! I promise if you melt no more than two fillets into your sauce, hubby will be none the wiser. BTW does he like worcestershire sauce, 'cause that is full of anchovies?

Hi tanna, we'll see!

Well I'm going to try them, just so I know.

 
At 9:14 am, Blogger Reb said...

Oooooo... throwing caution and finances to the wind! I reckon you'll get hooked for sure. I can already taste the anchovy bread.

 
At 11:01 am, Blogger Haalo said...

Sadly the best anchovies don't seem to be available anymore - they came from Western Australia and were produced by Mendolia and had the corny name of "auschovies" - they really were incredible.

 
At 3:59 pm, Blogger neil said...

Hi reb, I hope my bank manager has a sense of adventure too!

Hi haalo, I used to buy them too, they are superior to much of what comes into the country. They may still be available, I'll let you know.

 
At 9:44 pm, Anonymous Anonymous said...

pestle and mortar??? i dont own such a thing - i thought only chemists used those.

 
At 1:27 am, Anonymous Cristian said...

Please, please, do not give recipes for the Ortiz anchovies! I personally think it's a waste to mix them with anything, pizza included. The Ortiz jars come with their tiny forks for a reason - to use them.

So I propose this: take your Ortiz jar, go somewhere quiet; if you want to have your favorite wine around take it with you, take some bread if you want (sourdough or italian would best do). Concentrate on the anchovies; eat them directly from the can. Down some bread or some wine if needed.

 
At 5:18 am, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I came upon this blog while looking for a recipe. I saw the Half Moon restaurant in Melbourne featured on an episode of "No Reservations" a television cooking show in the United States featuring chef Anthony Bourdain. One of the items on the menu was fresh water lobsters with Ortiz Anchovies, Pedro Ximenez Sherry, and Pimentos. Checking the internet, I came across a notation that the Half Moon restaurant served prawns the same way.

I am curious, does anyone out there have a recipe for either of these dishes prepared with these terrific sounding ingredients? Have you dined at the Half Moon?

Since I live in the state of California in the United States, and have no plans for a trip to your country (much as I would love to visit), I am very curious.

If you have the time and inclination, I would love to hear from you. Thanks.

email:

babs99mail-melbourne@yahoo.com

 
At 11:01 pm, Blogger charles said...

How To Make money with affiliate programs Today. Affiliate marketing is the easier and probably the most effective method to make money from the internet. It is basically, a kind of selling technique where potential buyers from your website are directed to the websites of sellers. For every click, the website owner gets a small commission.

www.onlineuniversalwork.com

 

Post a Comment

<< Home



Search


Recipe Categories
Soups
Salads
Vegetables
Poultry
Pork
Beef
Cakes & Desserts
Miscellaneous

Archives
November 2005
December 2005
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
December 2006
January 2007
February 2007
March 2007
April 2007
May 2007
June 2007
July 2007
August 2007
September 2007
October 2007
November 2007
December 2007
January 2008
February 2008
March 2008
April 2008
May 2008
June 2008
July 2008
August 2008
September 2008
October 2008
November 2008
December 2008
January 2009
February 2009
March 2009
May 2009
June 2009
September 2009
October 2009
November 2009
December 2009
January 2010
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
May 2010
June 2010
July 2010
August 2010
September 2010
October 2010
November 2010
December 2010
February 2011
March 2011
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
July 2011
August 2011
September 2011
July 2012

Miscellaneous
AUSTRALIAN FOOD BLOGGERS
Prev ~ List ~ Random ~ Join ~ Next
Site Ring from Bravenet


Site Feed

counter easy hit

Credits
Blog Design by:


Image created by:
Ximena Maier

Powered by:


Photos, Original Recipes, and Text - (C) Copyright: 2005-2010
At My Table by Neil Murray, all rights reserved.
You may re-post a recipe, please give credit and post a link to this site.

Contact Me
Neil Murray

Follow messytable on Twitter